THE WETSUIT THAT GOES FROM BOARD MEETING TO SURFBOARD

It’s a busy world for today’s man. Multitasking is no longer a special skill, but a necessity to surviving the daily grind. Quiksilver Japan has created just the thing for the busy guy who’s sitting in boardrooms during the day and navigating waves on a long board

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during the off hours. Introducing True Wetsuits: a first of it’s kind suit that functions as a wetsuit in the water and once dry, can be worn as a regular menswear suit as well. The suiting is a result of a partnership between a Japanese affiliate of world’s leader in surf clothing and the Japan-based advertising agency TBWA/Hakuhodo.

While this collaboration may seem like a quirky gimmick to some, the idea resonates well with those men who value the sport of surf, a sense of style and time well spent. Quiksilver, Brand Director, Shin Kimitsuka noted its appeal for the fashionable surf set. “As your lifestyle changes, you have less time to go surfing. I thought it would be interesting to offer this product as a new solution to deal with this issue.” While it’s still too soon to see if this idea will take to the surfing masses, it’s ingenuity and forward-thinking design functions are worthy of some, ahem, off-the-hook recognition.

The four-piece ensemble comes complete with jacket, pants, shirt and tie. The jacket and pants are made from a fabric known as neoprene, an extremely high-stretch jersey material, which is the same kind used for the production of most wetsuits. The shirt is made from stretch Dryflight, a fabric co-developed by Quiksilver and 3M. It is the same material used for Quiksilver board shorts. The pockets on the suit are specially designed to prevent any water from being captured. The jacket features side openings to allow for full body movement. The tie is made from the same neoprene material of the jacket.

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The True Wetsuits are available in navy and black; and for more formal occasions, it’s also available in a tuxedo style. The suits are made-to-order and only available in Japan as of now. The total cost of the whole ensemble will set you back a total of $2,500.  So it seems that the combination of convenience and dapper-style won’t come without a price.

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